Supporting working mothers: it’s now time for a new narrative (2023)

Supporting working mothers: it’s now time for a new narrative (1)

Other insights from TopResume include 55% of those still working saying they’d leave their jobs voluntarily if given the option.

And the Great Discontent survey carried out by Workable in June 2021 points to the disparity in current working situation between the genders, with those identifying as female far more likely to be not working (26% vs. 15.3%) or working part-time (17.7% vs. 8.6%) than males in the United States.

The World Economic Forum also reported similar data:

What does that say about how our workplaces are doing in supporting working mothers?

We’ll let TopResume’s report answer that:

“Women have had to navigate the stress and time-management challenges of taking on the role of teacher and child-care provider while attempting to work or find work during quarantine. All of these factors together have led to what economists are calling the world’s first ‘she-cession’ – a women-led economic downturn.”

To gain further insight, we sat down with TopResume’s career expert Amanda Augustine – herself a working mom – for a conversation about this. Clearly, employers need to up their game if they want to be part of changing things for the better.

The plight of the working mother

The mother of a five-year-old boy with special needs, Amanda’s own personal and professional load is further stressed by the fact that she has a husband who works long hours as an essential worker. And, she says, women feel they have to take all that on – more so than men.

“I think for the working mother in general, we’ve grown up hearing, ‘You can do anything’, and we’ve somehow translated that over time into ‘You should do everything,’” says Amanda. “And there’s a lot of extra responsibility and weight and stress we put on ourselves.”

And that commitment to a full-time workload also ate into Amanda’s daily schedule. Before the pandemic, she commuted into New York City for work three times a week, translating into three hours of commuting each day. This meant less time with her son all around.

“I only saw my son for two hours a day on the weekdays. I was gone well before he was awake. And I came home, picked him up from daycare and I got two hours before he had to be in bed.”

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The sacrifice and the stigma

Work has long been an unmovable pillar around which we mold other parts of our lives. It’s created a situation where working mothers worry that if they make concessions in the workplace – such as arriving late or leaving early because they need to drop off or pick up their kids at school or the daycare, it impacts their career arc.

“[Those] suddenly become issues where they have to be navigated around fears that you’re not going to be put up for the promotion, or you’re not going to get the raise,” Amanda explains.

“And because whether, you know, whether [working mothers think] correctly or not, they’re going to assume that it’s either not feasible or that they’re concerned that other priorities will take over, which is just… it’s unfair.”

There’s also a proximity bias in the workplace that makes things even more difficult for working mothers forced to make amends in their schedule to accommodate demands on the home front.

“There’s this false assumption by managers that the people they see working in the office are more productive than the ones that they don’t see.”

It’s not COVID’s fault

These problems facing working mothers aren’t rooted in the pandemic. Rather, the pandemic simply exposed – and exacerbated – the problems that have long existed in the system.

“Many of us were already underwater before the pandemic and the pandemic was that last straw that broke the camel’s back,” says Amanda. “It pushed on all those little cracks and just made them that, that more obvious.”

That’s why working mothers are leaving the workforce in droves – if they can – because they’ve given up on the possibility of a much-needed balance between work and home life.

“Women aren’t going to just show up and sacrifice everything,” says Amanda, emphasizing that this is a situation faced by fathers as well.

“For some people, it’s a re-evaluation of their priorities. Many are assuming that they’re not going to find a job that’s going to allow them to still keep some of these things [remote work, etc.] that were actually the silver linings of the pandemic.”

That 69% statistic points to this new reality.

“What’s happening now is that people are [saying], ‘Do we really need that income? Can we get by without it? I’m going to hold out until there’s something that really makes sense and is a good fit. I’m not rushing back to the workplace, because I want to see what happens.’”

It’s a crisis, but it’s an opportunity

We’re already seeing a recruitment crisis – as indicated by the staggering numbers of job openings, higher than the number of unemployed, according to a report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This exodus of working mothers presents an added challenge for recruiters already facing depleted talent pools.

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“[Many] recruiters I hear from and talk to are just saying, ‘We can’t fill these positions. We can’t get people in the door what’s going on here.’”

And it’s not that these are not good opportunities. These are “white collar, corporate, good paying jobs”, Amanda adds.

“A good portion of your normal labor force or, you know, is not looking right now. And so you’re missing out on a lot of that.”

But there’s good news. They’ll come back – if the conditions are right.

“Many of them would probably come back [if] they’d be able to still bring in that money or do what they love, but in a more balanced fashion where they don’t feel as though they’re slightly underperforming in every aspect of their lives.”

That’s where greater support of working mothers is needed in the workplace. Forcing your employees to find a balance between work and home actually hurts at both ends. Something always has to give.

“If you’re feeling really great as a mom, you feel like you’re probably not the star employee that day. And if you’re really rocking it at work, chances are, you’re not feeling like you’re getting a gold star from your kids that day.

“And you know, it’d be nice if that wasn’t necessarily the feeling all the time.”

The need for flexible schedules

So how do you build an environment that supports working mothers? Obviously not every company can do everything – but you can start by looking at the things you can do that don’t drastically impact your bottom line. The first objective is to build up your support system that you can offer to a potential employee. Have a strategy that enables mothers to thrive in every area – both at home and at work.

One way to do that is introduce greater flexibility in work – a lesson we all learned from the pandemic, as shown in our New World of Work survey report in August 2020 which found that 71.1% of respondents see remote work and distributed teams as one of the biggest paradigm shifts coming out of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Amanda agrees.

“More jobs are becoming location agnostic. This giant work-from-home experiment has been successful for a lot of organizations,” she explains.

“There are a lot of employees that I know of while they were still working, moved across the country, just decided they’re like, ‘You know what? I don’t want this cost of living. And if I can work anywhere, I’m going to do it.’ A lot of people are relocating.”

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She points to her own company as an example.

“That’s why we’re not really going back to one central office. [It’s] because they saw it worked and they started hiring people all across the country.”

Another thing Amanda’s employer is doing right in supporting working mothers is leaving the responsibility of scheduling to employees.

“Are you getting your work done? Then we don’t care when you’re logging in and logging out. Are you there when you need to be for a meeting? Great. As long as you’re producing, no one cares.

“If you have to run out in the middle of the day to grab your kid or, you know, take them to the appointment or pick them up from daycare, as long as you’re getting your work done and you’re on when you need to be on for the very important meetings, nobody’s going to look twice and think there’s anything wrong.”

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Employers can step up their game

And that’s a mindset which needs to be adopted by employers if they want to attract – and retain – workers. That’s especially when it comes to working mothers, who benefit more from this than other professionals.

“Working mothers [see this] more as a necessity or a requirement as opposed to an extra benefit.”

You can step up your policies supporting working mothers if you’re looking to attract them to your company, especially if you don’t have the luxury of moving to a permanently remote or flexible working system.

Amanda suggests looking at your maternity leave policy, and looking at other ways you can help ease the demand that a working parent faces.

“Are you providing either stipends for daycare or are you providing onsite daycare or services? Do you have a service that you keep on retainer that your employees can call if they need help securing a last-minute babysitter because someone’s ill or something like that? Those services do exist.”

Be leaders by example

While these and other programs and policies are a great first step for employers, it’s not enough, says Amanda. It also comes down to the mentality of your organization – and from the very top.

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“It also has to come through in your communication. [Are you] a company that truly values and embraces and supports the working parent or various different lifestyles and is able to adapt?”

Personal experience plays a factor as well, she adds, recalling an anecdote from a friend who expressed that she couldn’t wait for her CEO and his wife to have a kid because “he doesn’t get it today”.

Instead, get ahead of that situation, with executive leadership setting the tone for a truly inclusive working environment.

Amanda described an experience before our interview where she was in a meeting with one of her own executives.

“She was sitting on her patio and she goes, ‘This may be my only moment of vitamin D all day, because I don’t know when my son gets home from daycare, if it’s going to be an outside or inside day’.”

That was a strong message from leadership. The result was that Amanda – and likely her other colleagues – now felt empowered to be able to do the same.

“I would have never considered that before, until I saw somebody a couple of rungs up for me doing it and it being perfectly OK, and not making a big deal about it.”

So pay attention, managers, directors, and executives.

“If you’re going to offer those benefits to your team, take them. If you’re encouraging them to take time off, you have to take a few days off too.”

This is a wakeup call – will you answer?

“There were a lot of awful things that came [in the pandemic], but I have to say for me, there were some definite silver linings. It has a lot to do with getting a better sense of what is a healthy work-life balance and what I want. But […] for many people out there, I think it’s a wakeup call.”

You can answer that call by updating your policies and employee management strategy to accommodate and support working mothers, and you’ll find that you attract the very best candidates to your company.

“It would be really nice if, if we could change that narrative and put systems in place that helped to support a new narrative out there,” Amanda says.

Don’t wait for others to set the standard – you can lead the charge. Be part of the solution.

Amanda Augustine is a well-recognized expert in career advancement, ranging from developing one’s professional brand to acing that next interview. She’s the resident career expert for TopResume, the world’s largest resume-writing service, as well as a certified professional resume writer (CPRW) and certified professional career coach (CPCC).

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FAQs

Is there ever a solution for working mothers cite examples? ›

Leave behind their favorite meals or snacks. – Have them “blog” about how they've spent their day. – Give them extra chores so they'll have a chance to earn money. – Set limits on TV and computer time – give them a reading assignment instead.

What do working moms struggle with the most? ›

Moms Face Burnout and Professional Impact

Working moms also face challenges in terms of their mental health and careers. According to the McKinsey study, more women than men report exhaustion, burnout and pressure to work more.

How would you describe a working mother? ›

One could define a working mother as a woman with the ability to combine a career with the added responsibility of raising a child.

How can I help my working mother? ›

12 ways to attract and support working mothers
  1. Know your workforce. ...
  2. Define the demographic. ...
  3. Focus resources on transition points. ...
  4. Offer accommodations for new mothers. ...
  5. Consider benefits that appeal to working moms. ...
  6. Advertise resources for working mothers that are already in place. ...
  7. Communicate often.

What are the advantages and disadvantages of working mothers? ›

We listed some of these advantages below.
  • Working moms become positive role models. ...
  • They raise more independent children. ...
  • Working moms are less prone to depression. ...
  • They have stories to tell outside their personal life. ...
  • Working moms are more tired and stressed. ...
  • They are also prone to health issues.

Do kids benefit from having a working mom? ›

Benefits for Kids of Working Moms

In fact, one study published in the National Bureau of Economic Research found the GPAs of children whose mothers worked at least part-time were 2.6 percent higher than the GPA of a child whose mother did not work.

How can working mom make life easier? ›

Try out these tips for working moms.
  1. Teach cleanup. Do you clean up toys, hang up coats, stow shoes, pick up laundry, and make beds? ...
  2. Delegate chores. Ask your kids/spouse to help you delegate. ...
  3. Plan your morning. ...
  4. Schedule quiet time. ...
  5. Plan a work schedule. ...
  6. Plan meals ahead. ...
  7. Schedule quality family time. ...
  8. Make time for yourself.

Who is happier working moms or stay at home moms? ›

WASHINGTON—Mothers with jobs tend to be healthier and happier than moms who stay at home during their children's infancy and pre-school years, according to a new study published by the American Psychological Association.

How do working moms fit everything? ›

Tips for Thriving as a Working Parent
  1. TIP 1: RECOGNIZE THAT YOU CAN'T GET IT ALL DONE. ...
  2. TIP 2: DON'T TRY TO DO IT ALL YOURSELF. ...
  3. TIP 3: SCHEDULE LIFE FIRST. ...
  4. TIP 4: FIND AN EMPLOYER THAT OFFERS FLEXIBILITY. ...
  5. TIP 5: MULTITASK FOR OPTIMAL TIME MANAGEMENT. ...
  6. TIP 6: TAKE TIME FOR SELF CARE.

Why are working mothers better? ›

Working mothers make good role models for their children by instilling in them a sense of self-confidence and the ability to set goals. They may also be more broad-minded and receptive to new ideas, since they break the traditional myths that place women as homemakers and not working professionals.

What is a working mother called? ›

Wikipedia classifies Mompreneur as neologism wherein a female business owner actively balances the role of mom and the role of entrepreneur. The catchphrase is a subset of the larger socio-economic phenomenon called “work at home parent”.

How does a working mother affect a child? ›

They understand the value of time faster while making the most of it. Children of working parents become independent from a very early age. Since they realise that their parents are at work, they learn to take their decisions themselves making them good and confident decision-makers.

What working moms want? ›

Family-friendly benefits can include a more flexible work schedule, remote options, mental health support and child care assistance. Some mothers who participated in the survey mentioned the need for a lactation room upon returning to onsite work.

How do working moms stop being overwhelmed? ›

Being a working mom has always had its challenges (and upsides).
...
How do I deal with being a working mother?
  1. Zero in on your burnout. “Burnout” is a big term. ...
  2. Request changes at work. ...
  3. Drop some balls. ...
  4. Adjust how you work. ...
  5. Be a loving parent… to yourself. ...
  6. Know your love language. ...
  7. Take breathing breaks. ...
  8. Channel your anxiety.

How does working parents affect child development? ›

Parents' work can affect all of this. For example, researchers have documented that children are more likely to spend time without parental supervision at younger ages if their parents are working, which may in turn harm the children's performance in school and increase their participation in risky behaviors.

Should working moms be given special privilege? ›

Yes, working moms should be given special privileges. When there is a regular family with two parents, there is at least one parent who is able to be the sole bread owner and the other parent takes care of the child/ children. In the case of a working mom she has to take care of the family as well as her job.

Should mothers work or stay at home essay? ›

I do not deny that mothers, who work, get a chance to be someone else other than just being Moms and as they are financially strong they hold a strong position at home. But the disadvantage is that mothers, who work, do not get enough time to spend with their children and this can make them feel guilty.

Are children of working mothers happier? ›

Children of working mothers are happier or as happy as the ones that have a stay at home mum. According to a New York times article, working mums should simply discard their feeling of guilt, improve work-life flexibility, and strive for equality at home and work.

How the children of working moms feel about them now? ›

And this recent study found that social acceptance of working moms continues to climb, with Millennials significantly more accepting than older generations. “Compared to their predecessors, 12th graders in the 2010s were more likely to support equal roles for men and women,” the report reads.

How children of working moms and stay-at-home moms differ? ›

For example, research findings suggest that when compared to stay-at-home moms: Children of working moms were found to have more education. Daughters of working moms are more likely to be employed, advance their careers, and have higher annual earnings.

What do busy moms need? ›

15 Fun and practical busy mom gifts
  • A water bottle or a to-go mug. Every mom needs a water bottle or a to-go mug they can take anywhere, so these are always top of the list for practical gifts for busy moms. ...
  • The Instant Pot. ...
  • A thawing plate. ...
  • A coffee maker. ...
  • A blender. ...
  • A robot vacuum. ...
  • Car Phone Mount. ...
  • Charging dock.
17 Sept 2022

How do working moms get it all done? ›

Here are my favorite 21 Hacks for Productivity. Every Working Mom will get something useful out of this. Let's do this:
  • Meditate. ...
  • List out what isn't working in life + work. ...
  • List out your desires for life + work. ...
  • Simplify at work + home. ...
  • Stop making things look easy. ...
  • Do a brain dump for your work + home tasks.

Are stay-at-home moms less likely to divorce? ›

These effects are important to consider, since stay-at-home mothers have lower divorce rates and higher fertility rates. Nor are these outcomes coincidental: workplace promotions of younger spouses (usually, but not always, wives) actually cause higher divorce rates.

Is being a stay-at-home mom harder than working? ›

Staying at home with your kids is HARDER than going into work, new study finds. Don't ever underestimate the challenges a stay-at-home mom faces on a daily basis. In fact, new research has found that many people find staying at home with your children HARDER than going into work!

How often should a stay-at-home mom get a break? ›

How often should a stay-at-home mom get to kick back and relax? A stay-at-home mom should take a break at least three times a day: once before her kids wake up, once after lunch, and after the kids go to bed. A mom of toddlers or babies should add a mid-morning and mid-afternoon break.

Why Working moms are so tired? ›

It could be because of dual role and responsibilities at work & home, guilt for not spending time with family and missing the bond with children. They have to Combat unrealistic expectations of being a perfect employee vs being a perfect parent.

How can a working mom prevent burnout? ›

8 Ways to Avoid Burnout as a Working Mom
  1. Don't multitask.
  2. Learn to say no and set boundaries.
  3. Ask for help or support.
  4. Practice self-care. Get enough sleep. ...
  5. Manage expectations and don't overcommit yourself.
  6. Spend time with your spouse or partner.
  7. Unwind and have a “me time”
  8. Seek professional help or try online therapy.
4 May 2022

How do busy working moms get in shape? ›

17 Tricks That Will Make It Easier to Be a Fit Mom
  1. First Things First. Work out before the day gets away from you. ...
  2. Block It Out. ...
  3. Have a Plan for How You'll Sweat. ...
  4. Don't Worry About Your Outfit. ...
  5. Take RUNch. ...
  6. Include Your Kids. ...
  7. Make the Jungle Gym Your Bootcamp. ...
  8. Run With 'Em.
10 Jan 2017

Why mother is a role model? ›

My mother is my role model because she does so much for me; she gives me everything she has just to make my life easier. I love my mother and I am so thankful that she is the way she is. My mother is always there for me and I would do anything for her.

Should a mother work full-time? ›

Yes, of course! Many mums work full-time or part-time, and still have a great relationship with their children. However, there may be some compromises you need to make in both your work and home-life.

What kind of work is done by most of the mothers? ›

She looks after the husband, kids, house, and household duties.

What defines a working woman? ›

a woman who is gainfully employed; often, specif., such a woman as distinct from a housewife.

Does both parents working affect child? ›

They found children's emotional health is better when both mothers and fathers believe family comes first, irrespective of how much time the parents spent working. Children were also better emotionally adjusted when both parents took pleasure in their work and treated their jobs as sources of challenge and creativity.

What are the problems faced by working parents? ›

Managing the kids, taking care of the family and juggling the responsibilities of the home along with a career, work commitments and deadlines put a lot of pressure on the working mom.

Do babies suffer when mothers return to work? ›

Do babies suffer when mothers return to work? Many moms feel guilty for not being with their babies during the workday, even if they know they're in good hands. Fortunately, research suggests that children don't experience any harm when their moms work outside the home.

How can employers help and support working parents? ›

They should also give working parents the time and resources they need to comfort and care for their children. This includes providing helpful tools that encourage talk, play and other forms of stimulation that children need from caregivers.

What support do parents need? ›

Parents can benefit from 3 kinds of support – practical support, emotional or personal support, and information or advice.

What can management do to better accommodate single parents and working parents? ›

To address this burnout, here are a few things companies need to keep in mind:
  • Make an effort to hire and promote solo parents. ...
  • Make company culture inclusive. ...
  • Structure and organize work creatively and flexibly. ...
  • Create opportunities to set boundaries, take breaks, and rest. ...
  • Help with child care.
28 Jun 2021

Why do mothers need alone time? ›

Being a healthy, happy mom is important to raising healthy, happy kids. Third, taking some time alone sends the message that self-care is important and shows your kids how to do the same. It teaches them to love themselves and rise to their highest potential.

What do working moms struggle with the most? ›

Moms Face Burnout and Professional Impact

Working moms also face challenges in terms of their mental health and careers. According to the McKinsey study, more women than men report exhaustion, burnout and pressure to work more.

What is depleted mother syndrome? ›

We're depleted Over time, mothers become physically, emotionally and mentally drained of nutrients, strength and vitality. Psychologist Rick Hanson coined the phrase “depleted mother syndrome” and emphasizes how important it is to regain the strength we need to be there for ourselves and to manage our care-giving role.

What does mom burnout feel like? ›

Symptoms of Mommy Burnout

Extreme mental fatigue or physical exhaustion. Being “short tempered” Feeling emotionally depleted. Feeling disconnected or isolated from others, including one's children.

Is there ever a solution for working mothers If you were the HR What will you do to this kind of problem? ›

HR can help retain working mothers by reaching out to them first and asking what they need to be successful and to stay in the job. This takes the weight of asking for help off the employees' shoulders and shows that the institution cares, recognizes their unique challenges and is willing to find solutions.

What can management do to better accommodate single parents and working parents? ›

To address this burnout, here are a few things companies need to keep in mind:
  • Make an effort to hire and promote solo parents. ...
  • Make company culture inclusive. ...
  • Structure and organize work creatively and flexibly. ...
  • Create opportunities to set boundaries, take breaks, and rest. ...
  • Help with child care.
28 Jun 2021

How can companies support mothers? ›

Organisations can help working mothers enroll their children in decent childcare programs by offering financial benefits or providing on-site child care services. Making childcare accessible and affordable will empower working mothers to balance their responsibilities.”

Why do moms make good employees? ›

“Working moms are organized, focused, and know how to multi-task and deal with rotating and fluctuating priorities.” Many working women find that being a mom has also made them more productive. Rachel D. Jaffe, Esq., SVP and Counsel at OneTitle National Guaranty Company, Inc., shares her experience.

Do babies suffer when mothers return to work? ›

Do babies suffer when mothers return to work? Many moms feel guilty for not being with their babies during the workday, even if they know they're in good hands. Fortunately, research suggests that children don't experience any harm when their moms work outside the home.

How do you balance work life and family life? ›

10 tips for balancing work and family time
  1. Reduce your stress levels. ...
  2. Discuss workplace flexibility with your employer. ...
  3. Create a plan. ...
  4. Focus on family-friendly workouts. ...
  5. Prioritize and delegate. ...
  6. Seek out support. ...
  7. Schedule in phone calls. ...
  8. Take a technology break.

How do working parents thrive? ›

The 9 Secrets To Thriving As A Working Mom
  1. Play In All Slices. ...
  2. Define Your Non-Negotiables. ...
  3. Get Rid Of Guilt. ...
  4. Design Your Boundaries. ...
  5. Use Your Magic Hour. ...
  6. Move To The Golden Triangle. ...
  7. Make Decisions Fast. ...
  8. Partner Up.
8 May 2016

How can employers help working parents? ›

They should also give working parents the time and resources they need to comfort and care for their children. This includes providing helpful tools that encourage talk, play and other forms of stimulation that children need from caregivers.

How do single working moms juggle? ›

5 tips from single parents on how to balance work and family
  1. Work as a team and communicate. “My girls and I make decisions, tackle bumps in the road and anything else that comes up as a team. ...
  2. Give yourself grace and patience. ...
  3. Carve out time for yourself. ...
  4. Say yes to support. ...
  5. Focus on quality time together.
17 Feb 2022

How can a working mom prevent burnout? ›

8 Ways to Avoid Burnout as a Working Mom
  1. Don't multitask.
  2. Learn to say no and set boundaries.
  3. Ask for help or support.
  4. Practice self-care. Get enough sleep. ...
  5. Manage expectations and don't overcommit yourself.
  6. Spend time with your spouse or partner.
  7. Unwind and have a “me time”
  8. Seek professional help or try online therapy.
4 May 2022

How do I support my employee returning from maternity leave? ›

Supporting Mothers' Return to Work After Maternity Leave
  1. Provide Paid Parental Leave. ...
  2. Reorient Upon Return. ...
  3. Welcome Back. ...
  4. Offer Flexible Schedule Options. ...
  5. Encourage Joining Employee Resource Groups. ...
  6. Ease Access to Childcare. ...
  7. Support Breastfeeding Employees. ...
  8. Support Emotional and Mental Wellness.

What is the percentage of working mothers in America? ›

Among married-couple families with children, 96.5 percent had at least one employed parent in 2021, and in 62.3 percent of these families both parents were employed.

Do parents make better employees? ›

You could be missing out on some of the best possible employees for your company by not hiring people with children at home. Multiple studies have showcased the value of working parents. Some of these studies show that parents are typically: More productive.

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